Study Habit for my Grandson’s Grades

Home Community Habit Challenge Study Habit for my Grandson’s Grades

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  • #5239
    Marjay
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 9

    I’m taking care of my grandson and I want him to do well in school. Until he can study on his own, I have to support him in his studies. I need to put my grandson first, and be sensitive to his needs, and above all have the fortitude to get this done. The study habit will hopefully reinforce that.

    #5241
    Ofpad
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 158

    Hey, Marjay! During the habit challenge, you’ll learn to overcome boredom and be able to keep up with your habits even when you are not motivated. It will take time and it will be a slow process, but you will have everything that you need ready to support your grandson!

    #5281
    Marjay
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 9

    This is a little complicated because my grandson will always have homework. I’m supposed to start small and make it snowball, but I can’t start small at the cost of the kid being unable to submit their homework. The upper limit will have to be however much work the school imposes on my grandson during that day.

    On my end, I always start by reviewing the materials I need to teach my grandson with. That’s always at 4 PM. The upper limit is one lesson per book per subject. There’s only so much room I have to increase intensity, but it’ll depend on how much work my kid gets and how I have to adapt.

    The study time will always be in one set because there’s no other time in the day for it. My kid is in school for most of the morning and in the afternoon. It’s only in the evenings that I have time to do this.

    #5283
    Ofpad
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 158

    Hi, Marjay! The weekdays might be hectic, but on weekends (especially when big projects are due the next week) it would still be better to break study time in two sets.  Also, since the goal is to help him until he learns to study on his own, it might be a good idea to let him study on his own during one day of the weekend (the other is left for rest). You can simply test him during that weekend to see how well he is doing on his own. 🙂

     

    #5285
    Marjay
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 9

    The study habit always starts as soon as my grandson gets home. Once he gets home, he changes clothes and then comes to me for the study session. I have a copy of the books he uses, so even if he leaves them in his locker I will be able to study with him. The books are always arranged in the living room so that they are easy to see as soon as he gets home.

    As for me, my habit starts as soon as I get home as well. In the same way that he sees the books once he gets home, I see it as well. I change into home clothes and begin my habit of reviewing the lesson that needs to be covered for that day.

    I don’t have a calendar or alarm set because the routine is a necessary daily activity.

    The other events that I have identified as triggers for my habits include the end of breakfast and lunch for the weekends. However, as much as possible I want Saturday reserved for my kid’s hobbies and Sunday reserved for church and spirituality.

    Aside from my morning routine, work, and meal preparation, I don’t quite have many habits to speak of. I habitually create a shopping list every Sunday and purchase its contents every Saturday.

    #5287
    Ofpad
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 158

    Hi, Marjay! Good job with creating triggers for your habits. You might have to create alarms at least for the projects that are due a week after. That way, you won’t forget when they are due and you won’t be forced to cram.

    #5288
    Marjay
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 9

    For my grandson, the start of the habit is always a review of what was taught in school. It serves as a warmup to proceed to the next lesson. For me, the start of the habit is flipping open the bookmark and reading the reminders I have for myself behind it.

    My grandson’s identity mantra is: I don’t skip studying and I don’t forget my homework.
    My identity mantra is: I don’t neglect my grandson.

    #5291
    Ofpad
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 158

    Those are great mantras, Marjay! Keep up the good work. 😀

    #5294
    Marjay
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 9

    I have to restock school supplies during the weekend, on the same day I shop for groceries, so that I won’t have to think about buying them each day. I unplug the TV and keep toys away from the living room so that my grandson is not tempted to play while studying. Aside from keeping the books on the living room, I also keep my grandson’s best scores on top of the table to keep him motivated.

    #5296
    Ofpad
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 158

    Placing the best scores on the table is a good touch, Marjay! That being said, make sure that you are not relying on those scores to stay motivated. The habit must always be doable without motivation.

    #5298
    Marjay
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 9

    When it comes to accountability, it seems that’s my role for my grandson. Aside from having to check his report card for his grades, I’m also responsible for making sure he actually keeps his habit. My grandson isn’t old enough to even consider pledging money, and there’s no point announcing the habit since he’s already doing that in school. That being said, we do pay tuition fees and that in itself is money that needs to be put to good use.

    #5300
    Ofpad
    Participant
    • Topics: 0
    • Replies: 158

    Hi, Marjay! It seems natural that there’s a lot at stake when it comes to making a study habit. However, since you yourself have to create habits to sustain his, you also have to find a way to get accountability for yourself.

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